Rush!

is an ongoing project that, for lack of a better description, I often call abstract street photography. It is quite a stretch from my usual style, but to work on it is always fun to me and I gain a lot from it. That's why I thought it is time, to take it out of the shadows and put it up here...

The hustle and bustle everywhere,the multitude of ever-changing sensations, the traffic, people, lights, signs, shops, ads, and a few hundred things more. I can never quite blend all of that out, it´s still there and keeps me alert - constantly. There are people who strive in this environment. They drink it in and get energized by it. I am not one of them.

Only a couple of years ago, when I was giving street photography yet another try in one of the busiest areas of Beijing, my view of the problem changed. I was once again frustrated because I couldn’t get into the flow of shooting when it hit me: I realized I was trying to convey a feeling, that I simply didn’t feel! How on earth did I ever expect this to work? How am I to produce something „real“, when I am faking it to begin with? So I started using what I was actually feeling: the stress, the tension and the hectic, that get a hold of me in cities. And this way RUSH! was born...

 
 

To clarify this right from the start, I would never consider myself a street photographer! I admire quite a few incredibly talented artists, you could call traditional street photographers. I love the genre and the authentic scenes full of life and humanity these artists manage to capture. But whenever I find myself in a big city, which happens quite frequently as a nomad, I never manage to „see“ these scenes myself, even though they are undoubtedly there. The reason for that is quite simple: Cities stress me out.

I don’t turn into a phobic mess the moment I step out of the subway Downtown. There are days I enjoy everything a big city has to offer - especially all the superb coffee shops.

But nonetheless, cities are stress.

...

Tibetan Shepard

...My horse finds its way up the hill easily and is apparently quite happy that the amateur on his back is not trying to lead its way. After all, my four-legged friend walked this path probably many hundred times, so that I happily leave the navigation to him. And it gives me the time to fully enjoy my surroundings anyway...

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...We left Tagong (Tibetan region, Sichuan Province, China) earlier this morning and are now on our way into the mountains. We’re following our guide over green hills and long small streams, some of which we have to cross on horseback and which are suddenly not that small anymore when you stand in the middle of it. Our destination is a family of Tibetan Nomads, yak shepherds, who set up their summer camp in this area... 

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...We’re planning to spend one night in the camp and make our way back home tomorrow. During this time we have the chance to help them to round up their yaks, wittiness the birth of a calve and to be overwhelmed by their hospitality and kindness. We found people who live a tough life and who have to work hard for everything they have, but are happy to share anyway...

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...When we get our horses ready on the next morning, we do it in silence. We are speechless, by the beauty of this land and its people...